Thursday, September 29, 2011

End of September Book Haul

I got bored and when I get bored, I often look through hundreds of pages, at both Amazon and Barnes and Noble, of bargain books. Often times they are books I'd like to read but sometimes I do just buy random stuff because the cover looks cool. Well, I ended up buying a nice amount of books in the past week. All of the below were Bargain Buys, except for "Beautiful Creatures," which I bought at full price because I already own "Beautiful Darkness," the second book, AND "Windup Girl" by Paolo Bacigalupi, because I loved "Ship Breaker."




Yes. I finally gave in and bought "Hush, Hush." I've heard so many mixed reviews but I keep coming back to that awesome, beautiful cover. I'll definitely review that one.

Update!

I know I've been rather quiet recently. I heard the crickets too.

I have started reading the Hunger Games trilogy and finally got on board the whole "obsessed with Hunger Games" train. Because the books are so popular, I decided not to review them. I mean, the first book has over three thousand reviews on Amazon. I really doubt my review would say anything the others have not. I can say that it's definitely a 5-star read for me. I got so sucked into the book that I haven't really read much else and it's taken me a long time to read because I am savoring every moment.

So please bear with me as I read this trilogy and then continue on with my reviews and such. I'm also going to be doing a big "Mailbox" post because even though I said I would buy no more books - I lied. :X

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Review: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

Title: The Night Circus
Author: Erin Morgenstern
Publisher: Doubleday
Genre:  Fiction
Rating: 3/5

Why I picked it: Loved the premise from the get-go.
Synopsis: The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway—a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them, this is a game in which only one can be left standing, and the circus is but the stage for a remarkable battle of imagination and will. Despite themselves, however, Celia and Marco tumble headfirst into love—a deep, magical love that makes the lights flicker and the room grow warm whenever they so much as brush hands.

True love or not, the game must play out, and the fates of everyone involved, from the cast of extraordinary circus per­formers to the patrons, hang in the balance, suspended as precariously as the daring acrobats overhead.
Review: I know I am going to reflect the minority here but I did not love the book as much as I wanted to. Maybe it was the repeated hype and build-up, or maybe it was my own excitement, but I really expected a lot out of this book and it did not deliver.

First of all, it took me about 100 pages to get into the book, which was longer than anticipated. I kept reading but it took me a while to get into the energy and flow of the back-and-forth dialogue enough to be truly excited about picking it back up.  While the writing and description were wonderful, the characters struck me as rather bland.  I felt this especially about Marco and Celia, who - as two of the more magical people - could have been focused on more, and given more time in the book. The whole storyline is centered on this competition that both Marco and Celia are unwilling participants in. Instead of pity or empathy, I could offer no emotions for the two protagonists as they did not come off as tangible people. I understand this is supposed to be "magical" but what good is magic if there is no element to tie it to the reader?

My favorites, by far, were the secondary characters - Bailey, Herr Thiessen, Poppet and Widget, and Tsukiko. The colorfulness of these characters, added to the overwhelming blandness of the gray mood of the circus as a whole. While we get bits and pieces of their overlapping stories, Morgenstern chooses to do so in a disjointed time-frame that is often confusing. Her narrative jumps forwards and backwards, but there is really very little reason for her to employ this technique, as the general flow of the story is very linear.

My absolutely favorite thing about this book was the imaginative scenery and the circus as a whole. The smells, sights, and sounds of it were so beautifully explained, that I could almost smell caramel apple as I sat reading it. The many different tents that were a part of the circus were so creative and wonderful that I found myself longing to be a part of that world. The ice garden, in particular, was so beautifully explained. I loved that this book made me imagine the circus so vividly. While the descriptions help, it left just enough out that I am sure my version of the ice garden is different from that of anyone else.

I would recommend this book to other readers who love a fairy-tale like story but are not looking for too much emotional involvement or character substance. I have heard that the rights to the movie version of "The Night Circus" have already been bought and I think that is fantastic! The book is so visual, that I just hope that the studio who will be responsible can do it justice.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Mid-September Book Haul

I've been buying random books here and there after my last Borders run (which I, of course, forgot to include in this kind of post), but I really am trying hard to stop - it's just difficult. I've also won 5 books in the past week or so. That justifies my habits. At least they're winnings and NOT books I bought. ;)

Here are the random titles I have obtained in the past two weeks:

These four I WON, thanks to the wonderful ladies over at Smexy Books.


Random Amazon Bargain Buys


More cheap Amazon buys PLUS "Night Circus," which I pre-ordered.


And last but not least, I won the following book from Shelf Awareness, YAY!!!



How terribly exciting!! I believe it also may be signed, but I don't know for sure. Has anyone read any of them? Any tips or reviews?? :D

Lastly, I must explain the lack of updates. I was really sick last week and barely even on the computer. I am back! But...still kinda slacking on the reading. I did start "The Night Circus," but I'm not as into it as I thought I would be...and I'm on page 144. Not that it's bad, but it's definitely not the page turner I anticipated it to be. I'll have a review up once I'm finished, for sure, but I can't guarantee when that will be.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Giveaway @ Parajunkee's Tumblr

Want to win your very own copy of Alyson Noël’s “Dreamland”?
Check out Parajunkee's Tumblr, where you can enter to win!!

About “Dreamland”:
“Riley’s finding that the afterlife can be a lonely place when all you do is focus on work. So she goes to the place where dreams happen, hoping to find a way to contact her sister, Ever. She meets the director, who tells her about the two ways to send dreams. As a Dream Jumper, a person can jump into a dreamer’s dream, share a message, and participate. As a Dreamweaver, an entire dream can be created in a studio and sent to the dreamer. But Dreamweaving was outlawed decades ago, and the studio was boarded up. Thinking it’s her only way to reach out to her sister, Riley goes in search of the old studio. There she finds a ghost boy, who’s been creating and sending nightmares to people for years. In order to stop him and reach out to Ever, Riley is going to have to confront and overcome her own fears.”

Alyson Noël continues the bestselling story of Riley Bloom as she learns how dreams are made and tries to make contact with her sister, Ever.

Links:

Macmillan page for Alyson Noël:
http://us.macmillan.com/author/alysonnoel
Become a Facebook fan: http://www.facebook.com/OfficialAlysonNoel
Website: http://www.alysonnoel.com/





Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Minor Rant

I'm totally hating UPS right now. I pre-ordered "The Night Circus" by Erin Morgenstern, because I was so giddy-ly excited for it. Turns out UPS claims they tried to deliver it and no one was home. Nuh uh! I was home and there was no notice left on my door!

I had planned on it being my read but since it's not here...but will be tomorrow...I'm going to read the shortest book in my TBR pile, which is "Address Unknown" by Katherine Kressmann Taylor. I just really hope it's enough and that I get my book tomorrow.

::fingers crossed::

Review: Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi

Title:Ship Breaker
Author: Paolo Bacigalupi
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Genre:  YA, Dystopian
Rating: 5/5

Why I picked it: It was on sale for like $4 at Borders and I was really interested in Bacigalupi's other book "The Wind-Up Girl."

Synopsis: Set initially in a future shanty town in America's Gulf Coast region, where grounded oil tankers are being dissembled for parts by a rag tag group of workers, we meet Nailer, a teenage boy working the light crew, searching for copper wiring to make quota and live another day. The harsh realities of this life, from his abusive father, to his hand to mouth existence, echo the worst poverty in the present day third world. When an accident leads Nailer to discover an exquisite clipper ship beached during a recent hurricane, and the lone survivor, a beautiful and wealthy girl, Nailer finds himself at a crossroads. Should he strip the ship and live a life of relative wealth, or rescue the girl, Nita, at great risk to himself and hope she'll lead him to a better life. This is a novel that illuminates a world where oil has been replaced by necessity, and where the gap between the haves and have-nots is now an abyss. Yet amidst the shadows of degradation, hope lies ahead.
Review:  What an amazing book! I literally could not put it down and finished it in a little over a day.

"Ship Breaker" centers on a young boy, Nailer, who works in a bleak, gray world salvaging the more precious metals on old ships that have long since been out of commission. He belongs to a "crew" and knows very little of life outside of his physical, dangerous job or his abusive drug-addicted father. Nailer is basically the picture-perfect definition of an underdog. Everything has the potential to change when he comes upon a wrecked ship that is loaded with treasures and riches...if not for the fact that the ship has a lone survivor: a beautiful, rich girl who has a story of her own.

The book takes the reader on a whirl-wind adventure through a dark world where New Orleans, and other Gulf cities, are completely underwater, oil and chemical sludge cover the oceans, and the divide between rich and poor is great. Thanks to Bacigalupi's extremely vivid descriptions and rich - almost poetic - writing, it is a world that seems eerily possible.

While many consider this novel grittier than other dystopian books, I feel that the "grit" is exactly why it works. It is the type of book that stays with you, long after you've closed its pages. For all the reasons outlined above, the book gets a 5-star rating for me.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Review: A Wallflower Christmas by Lisa Kleypas

Title: A Wallflower Christmas (Wallflowers #5)
Author: Lisa Kleypas
Publisher: Avon Books
Genre:  Historical Romance
Rating:4/5

Why I picked it: Last installment of Lisa Kleypas' amazing Wallflower series.
Synopsis: It’s Christmastime in London and Rafe Bowman has arrived from America for his arranged meeting with Natalie Blandford, the very proper and beautiful daughter of Lady and Lord Blandford. His chiseled good looks and imposing physique are sure to impress the lady in waiting and, if it weren’t for his shocking American ways and wild reputation, her hand would already be guaranteed. Before the courtship can begin, Rafe realizes he must learn the rules of London society. But when four former Wallflowers try their hand at matchmaking, no one knows what will happen. And winning a bride turns out to be more complicated than Rafe Bowman anticipated, especially for a man accustomed to getting anything he wants. However, Christmas works in the most unexpected ways, changing a cynic to a romantic and inspiring passion in the most timid of hearts.

Review: The first thing one notices about this conclusion to Lisa Kleypas' awesome Wallflowers series is how short it is. It also centers around a brand-new heroine who has had no parts in any of the other novels. For these two reasons, I really thought I wasn't going to like this book as much as I did. Not to be cliche, but it was short and sweet.

The book centers on Rafe Bowman, brother to Daisy and Lillian, who gets an ultimatum from his father to either marry Natalie, a well-bred English lady, or to lose his share of the Bowman's huge amounts of money.  Instead of Natalie, he becomes completely captured with Hannah, who is of plainer stock.  Natalie, of course, sees him as an ill-behaved, American rake. While this center storyline is occurring, readers get a kind of "what are they doing now?" look into the lives of the previous Wallflowers. Although this book takes place almost right after the last, it was really nice to get a glimpse into those characters who we have grown really attached to.

Lisa Kleypas did a really nice job of joining a new story with glimpses into the current lives of the previous Wallflowers. The new characters were well thought-out and the old kept the same traits that made us love them in the first place. Overall, it was a really satisfying companion to the series and I would highly recommend it to anyone who has read the prior books.

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Review: Scandal in Spring by Lisa Kleypas

Title: Scandal in Spring (Wallflowers #4)
Author: Lisa Kleypas
Publisher: Avon Books
Genre:  Historical Romance
Rating: 3.5/5

Why I picked it: Book #4 of Lisa Kleypas' amazing Wallflower series.
Synopsis: After spending three London seasons searching for a husband, Daisy Bowman's father has told her in no uncertain terms that she must find a husband. Now. And if Daisy can't snare an appropriate suitor, she will marry the man he chooses—the ruthless and aloof Matthew Swift.

Daisy is horrified. A Bowman never admits defeat, and she decides to do whatever it takes to marry someone . . . anyone . . . other than Matthew. But she doesn't count on Matthew's unexpected charm . . . or the blazing sensuality that soon flares beyond both their control. And Daisy discovers that the man she has always hated just might turn out to be the man of her dreams.

But right at the moment of sweet surrender, a scandalous secret is uncovered . . . one that could destroy both Matthew and a love more passionate and irresistible than Daisy's wildest fantasies.
Review:  I hate to admit it but this was probably my least favorite book in the Wallflower series. Then again, it's hard to follow "Devil in Winter," which is likely one of the best romance books I have read in some time.

This book is focused upon Daisy Bowman, the last Wallflower left without a husband. Daisy is a character I can relate to. She's cute, witty, and bookish. Best of all, she does not give off an air of "damsel in distress" and desperation that is often found in other romance books.

The book begins with an ultimatum: Either Daisy marry Matthew Swift, a trusted business partner of her father, or she finds someone else to marry before the Bowman family returns back to New York permanently. As with every historical romance book I have read, there is required a certain suspension of facts and general beliefs. This one was pretty bad on that front.

For one, Matthew Swift spends a large portion of the book denying Daisy for reasons untold, until we get to the end of the book. Instead of being satisfied with this plot-line being wrapped up, I was more saying to myself "Really? That's why? That's umm..silly." Also in this book, more than the other Wallflower books, I found myself asking "Why is it so hard for her to find a husband?" Not only is Daisy beautiful, but she's also obscenely rich! The other Wallflowers genuinely had things that may be off-putting to snobby gentlemen callers (a stutter, a brash personality, or a lack of money). Daisy just is imaginative and likes books.

Overall, this may not have been a bad read as a stand-alone. I can't really rate it down much because Lisa Kleypas really knows how to write a damn good romance book, and I did find myself smiling or giggling at certain points. The problem is that it's in line with three other books in the Wallflowers series that are all just so damned good that it's hard for me to rate this one higher.

Friday, September 9, 2011

More Purchases!

So, I am hitting up Borders again today, for the last time before it permanently closes its doors. ::sniffle:: Hopefully there is still some great stuff left for me to browse through. I do anticipate a big 'ol "book haul" update very soon, and maybe I'll do my first video!!

Have a happy Friday, everyone!!

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Waiting On Wednesday


"Waiting on Wednesday" is a weekly meme hosted over at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we are eagerly anticipating

This week (like everyone else in the book blogosphere), I am waiting on:

The Night Circus
by Erin Morgenstern
Out September 13th

I'm so excited for this book, that I've actually pre-ordered it and I really can't remember the last time I cared about any sort of release enough to pre-order it. It just looks terrific and I can't wait to have the review up for everyone!

Synopsis (from Goodreads): The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black- and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway—a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them, this is a game in which only one can be left standing, and the circus is but the stage for a remarkable battle of imagination and will. Despite themselves, however, Celia and Marco tumble headfirst into love—a deep, magical love that makes the lights flicker and the room grow warm whenever they so much as brush hands.

True love or not, the game must play out, and the fates of everyone involved, from the cast of extraordinary circus per­formers to the patrons, hang in the balance, suspended as precariously as the daring acrobats overhead.

Written in rich, seductive prose, this spell-casting novel is a feast for the senses and the heart.

Monday, September 5, 2011

Review: Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce

Title: Sisters Red
Author: Jackson Pearce
Publisher: Little Brown and Company
Genre:  YA, Fairy Tales
Rating: 4.5/5

Why I picked it: A fairy tale retelling? Yes please!!
Synopsis: Scarlett March lives to hunt the Fenris--the werewolves that took her eye when she was defending her sister Rosie from a brutal attack. Armed with a razor-sharp hatchet and blood-red cloak, Scarlett is an expert at luring and slaying the wolves. She's determined to protect other young girls from a grisly death, and her raging heart will not rest until every single wolf is dead.

Rosie March once felt her bond with her sister was unbreakable. Owing Scarlett her life, Rosie hunts ferociously alongside her. But even as more girls' bodies pile up in the city and the Fenris seem to be gaining power, Rosie dreams of a life beyond the wolves. She finds herself drawn to Silas, a young woodsman who is deadly with an ax and Scarlett's only friend--but does loving him mean betraying her sister and all that they've worked for?
Review: Okay, first of all, how awesome is the cover of this book? Seriously, I can't stop looking at the prettiness if it and it automatically drew me to the book right off the bat.

Secondly...wow! What an amazing story! Told from the perspectives of the two main characters, Scarlett and Rosie, the book delivers in terms of action, suspense, and romance. I must admit it took me a little bit of time to get into the book (about 50 pages or so), but once I hit that point, I was hooked and read the rest of the book in one sitting. Seriously.

There were a lot of elements that made this fairy tale exactly that. Setting, tone, and narrative all made me feel like I was in that magical world with the characters. Jackson Pearce entwined that world with the modern day and instead of feeling inauthentic or forced, it actually worked!! I think it also helped that the characters were really great.

Sisters Scarlett and Rosie have a relationship that is complex and deep. I found that the switched perspective (each chapter alternates as either being told by Rosie or Scarlett), actually really helped get into the core of what each character was feeling. It kinda would have been nice to hear more from Silas and what he was thinking, but that is just a minor point for me, as I really enjoyed his character.

My automatic instinct was to empathize with Rosie and pity Scarlett but as I got further on in the book, I felt more empathy for Scarlett as well. Although she was unwillingly thrust into a life where she is aware of the Fenris, due to tragedy striking, she takes that knowledge and chooses to turn it into something tangible. She chooses to fight every day for what she believes  and to protect those innocents who don't know any better.

Overall, this was a terrific, quick read that I would recommend across the board. It's a modern take on a classic story that isn't merely a retelling. It's a complete overhaul for today's audiences, and it's one that rocks!!

Friday, September 2, 2011

Review: Alpha by Rachel Vincent (Shifters #6)

Title: Alpha
Author: Rachel Vincent
Publisher: Mira Books
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Rating:4/5

Why I picked it: Last book in the Shifters series, which I have read all of.
Synopsis (From the back of the book): YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE FAYTHE…

The unscrupulous new Council chair has charged Jace, Marc, and me with trespassing, kidnapping, murder, and treason. Yeah, we’ve been busy. But now it’s time to take justice into our own hands. We must avenge my brother’s death and carve out the rot at the heart of the Council.

It’s not going to be easy, and loss seems unavoidable, but I have promised to protect my Pride, no matter what. With a target on my back and Marc at my side, I’m heading for a final showdown that can—that will—change everything forever.
Review: Geez. I thought I had a hard time trying to sort my thoughts after the last book. This one...well it's even more difficult. The conclusion of this 6-book series certainly packs a punch, but the kind of punch where you're not really trying to leave any bruise - if you know what I mean.

We knew what was coming in this book and the all-out war with Cal Malone is finally fought. After all the backstabbing (literally and figuratively), kidnappings, and arrests, Faythe and her Pride finally have the chance to get their payback. As with everything Faythe seems to be involved in, nothing comes easy. "Alpha" actually did raise my opinion of her, a lot. In particular, there is one scene where the reader is just left alone with Faythe and her thoughts as she shifts to heal her wounds. It was really powerful stuff and was the first time I thought to myself "Holy hell, that is one bad-ass and strong character."

With that being said, I don't think there's enough progression in Faythe overall to make the "Faythe haters" change their minds. As a matter of fact, I can't tell if I grew to like her more than I did initially or if I just got used to her. What I can tell you is that I did grow to love some of the secondary characters in this book, and Rachel Vincent had them frame Faythe so well that, for me, they became more important than the main character herself.

As a finale, the book is not without heart-wrenching events and "OMGWTF!" moments, but I found it to be much more subdued than in say, "Pride." You're very aware that the series is winding down and that Rachel Vincent is wrapping things up. There are still action-packed scenes but they feel rushed compared to the epic battles portrayed in the previous books.

Rachel Vincent clearly has a gift for storytelling. The world she creates is so rich and so well though out that the main bonus, for me, of reading Shifters was to be more and more immersed into that.  Overall though, I did enjoy the series and this book was as decent of an ending as any would have been. Would I recommend it to others? Yes! But I would also warn them that if by Book 2 or 3, they still completely hate Faythe, to not even bother with the rest.

Book Blogger Hop (9/2/11)

Book Blogger HopHosted by Jen at Crazy-For-Books.

This week's question: “What are you most looking forward to this fall/autumn season – A particular book release? Halloween? The leaves changing color? Cooler temperatures? A vacation? (If your next season is other than fall/autumn, tell us about it and what you are most looking forward to in your part of the world!)”


I love Fall and all the wonderful things that are associated with that season - apple picking, cider, leaves changing colors, good hair weather. Heheh. Halloween is also one of my absolute favorite holidays. Who can resist playing dress-up, no matter how old you are!!!!

Thursday, September 1, 2011

End of August Book Haul

So I bought A TON of books in the last 4 days. I was actually going to take this opportunity to do my very first video "In My Mailbox" but the video would have been like 10-15 minutes long so I opted to just do an image listing of the books I bought. As you can see...I have really REALLY eclectic tastes in my books.

Unfortunately for me, with this last haul - I swore that I would NOT purchase any more books until 2012. Yes. 2012. See...I have a really bad problem where I buy books so often that my "To Be Read" pile grows at an alarming rate. Currently, it's at about 120 books...no joke. Soooo...NO MORE! I'm still going to be doing contests and stuff to possibly win books but no more will be purchased until I make a damn good dent in my shelf. Perhaps I can take a picture of it for y'all at sometime next week so you can see just how bad it really is. :)

And without further ado...the books I purchased in the past 4 days!!
(I'm especially excited about Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, which I've had my eye on since it first came out, but have been waiting for it to go on sale - all the rest of the books were bargains and less than $5 a pop- until I just couldn't take it anymore!)











Has anyone read any of them? Any tips or reviews?? :D

Top 100 YA Books

I found this list on The Book Rat, based on a poll and list compiled earlier this year by Persnickety Snark. You can find out about all the work that went into it and how the votes were tabulated at Persnickety Snark.

Titles I've read are in bold, ones I own are italicized.

1. The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
2. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J.K. Rowling
3. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
4. Speak, Laurie Halse Anderson
5. Northern Lights (aka The Golden Compass), Philip Pullman
6. The Truth About Forever, Sarah Dessen
7. The Book Thief, Markus Zusak
9. Twilight, Stephenie Meyer
10. This Lullaby, Sarah Dessen

11. Looking for Alaska, John Green
12. Just Listen, Sarah Dessen
13. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J.K. Rowling
14. Little Women, Louisa May Alcott
15. City of Bones, Cassandra Clare
16. On the Jellicoe Road, Melina Marchetta
17. The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger
18. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J.K. Rowling
19. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Stephen Chbosky
20. Along for the Ride, Sarah Dessen

21. Shiver, Maggie Stiefvater
22. Vampire Academy, Richelle Mead
23. Graceling, Kristin Cashore
24. Thirteen Reasons Why, Jay Asher
25. Sloppy Firsts, Megan McCafferty
26. The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien
27. Alanna: The First Adventure, Tamora Pierce -- YESSS!
28. Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card
29. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, J.K. Rowling
30. Uglies, Scott Westerfeld

31. A Great and Terrible Beauty, Libba Bray
32. Tomorrow, When the War Began, John Marsden
33. The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks, E. Lockhart
34. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
35. The Westing Game, Ellen Raskin
36. Paper Towns, John Green
37. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J.K. Rowling
38. Catching Fire, Suzanne Collins
39. A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, Betty Smith

40. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Sherman Alexie
41. Lock and Key, Sarah Dessen
42. The Amber Spyglass, Philip Pullman
43. Evernight, Claudia Gray
44. Sabriel, Garth Nix
45. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J.K. Rowling
46. Beautiful Creatures, Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl
47. Forever, Judy Blume
48. I Capture the Castle, Dodie Smith
49. Ella Enchanted, Gail Carson Levine

50. The Princess Diaries, Meg Cabot
51. Stargirl, Jerry Spinelli
52. Howl’s Moving Castle, Diana Wynne Jones
53. The Dark is Rising, Susan Cooper
54. Hush, Hush, Becca Fitzpatrick
55. Saving Francesca, Melina Marchetta
56. Second Helpings, Megan McCafferty
57. Dreamland, Sarah Dessen
58. Eclipse, Stephenie Meyer
59. Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, Rachel Cohn, David Levithan
60. Fire, Kristin Cashore

61. The Chocolate War, Robert Cormier
62. Weetzie Bat, Francesca Lia Block
63. The Diary of a Young Girl, Anne Frank
64. Looking for Alibrandi, Melina Marchetta
65. How I Live Now, Meg Rosoff
66. City of Glass, Cassandra Clare
67. Keeping the Moon, Sarah Dessen
68. Breaking Dawn, Stephenie Meyer
69. Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging, Louise Rennison
70. If I Stay, Gayle Forman

71. The King of Attolia, Megan Whalen Turner
72. Wintergirls, Laurie Halse Anderson
73. Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast, Robin McKinley
74. The Blue Sword, Robin McKinley
75. Feed, M.T. Anderson
76. The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants, Ann Brashares
77. Go Ask Alice, Anonymous
78. Wicked Lovely, Melissa Marr
79. Lord of the Flies, William Golding
80. Someone Like You, Sarah Dessen

81. The Forest of Hands and Teeth, Carrie Ryan
82. Jacob Have I Loved, Katherine Paterson
83. The Knife of Never Letting Go, Patrick Ness
84. Poison Study, Maria V. Snyder
85. Shadow Kiss, Richelle Mead
86. The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle, Avi
87. An Abundance of Katherines, John Green
88. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, Mark Haddon
89. A Ring of Endless Light, Madeleine L’Engle
90. Glass Houses, Rachel Caine

91. The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume I:The Pox Party, M.T. Anderson
92. Walk Two Moons, Sharon Creech
93. Whale Talk, Chris Crutcher
94. Perfect Chemistry, Simone Elkeles
95. Going Too Far, Jennifer Echols
96. The Last Song, Nicholas Sparks
97. Before I Fall, Lauren Oliver
98. Hatchet, Gary Paulsen
99. The Pigman, Paul Zindel
100. The Hero and the Crown, Robin McKinley

22 read? Hmph. I need to get some more of these and brush up on my YA!!